I WAS THE ONE WHO SHOWED YOU THE SKY

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whitney. twenty-four. books, art, film, & baseball.
"but you know the worst thing about her? she works for the library."

laughing-trees:

Look at you little cute fluff

laughing-trees:

Look at you little cute fluff

(Source: awwww-cute, via talldecafcappuccino)

— 1 hour ago with 96991 notes
shoulderblades:

salvador dalí for vogue paris, december 1971

shoulderblades:

salvador dalí for vogue paris, december 1971

(via wineandjudgment)

— 2 hours ago with 5123 notes
visual-poetry:

»fun fun fun« by pietro sanguineti (+)

visual-poetry:

»fun fun fun« by pietro sanguineti (+)

— 3 hours ago with 185 notes
kateyjean:

I sat in Copenhagen Airport for 2.5 hours and made some patterns to calm my nerves. 

kateyjean:

I sat in Copenhagen Airport for 2.5 hours and made some patterns to calm my nerves. 

— 3 hours ago with 5 notes
oysterbridgeandco:

Ferns
watercolour & stitch on hand dyed paper
finished in old French frames with original glass
available to purchase at Rosehip in the Country

oysterbridgeandco:

Ferns

watercolour & stitch on hand dyed paper

finished in old French frames with original glass

available to purchase at Rosehip in the Country

(via fiebre)

— 3 hours ago with 670 notes
deerpaths:

White Flowers section of the book Flowers by Colour

deerpaths:

White Flowers section of the book Flowers by Colour

(via fiebre)

— 3 hours ago with 342 notes
alienz-queen:

starrystillness:

The stars in winter from the Ladybird books, The Night Sky and The Stars and Their Legends.

alienz-queen:

starrystillness:

The stars in winter from the Ladybird books, The Night Sky and The Stars and Their Legends.

(via rookiekid)

— 4 hours ago with 8039 notes
"So raise a glass to teenage girls for their linguistic innovation. It expands our expressive vocabulary, giving us new words and modes of expression. Speakers may nostalgically look to a previous golden era of English, but the truth is that Shakespeare’s English is an abomination of Chaucer’s English, which is an abomination of Beowolf’s. Language is inherently unstable. It’s in a constant state of flux, made and remade—stretched, altered, broken down and rearranged—by its speakers every day. Rather than a sign of corruption and disorder, this is language in its full vitality—a living, evolving organism."
— 4 hours ago with 5710 notes

mousekeears:

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, a young prince lived in a shining castle. Although he had everything his heart desired, the prince was spoiled, selfish, and unkind. But then, one winter’s night, an old beggar woman came to the castle and offered him a single rose in return for shelter from the bitter cold. Repulsed by her haggard appearance, the prince sneered at the gift and turned the old woman away. But she warned him not to be deceived by appearances, for beauty is found within. And when he dismissed her again, the old woman’s ugliness melted away to reveal a beautiful enchantress. The prince tried to apologize, but it was too late, for she had seen that there was no love in his heart. And as punishment, she transformed him into a hideous beast and placed a powerful spell on the castle and all who lived there. Ashamed of his monstrous form, the Beast concealed himself inside his castle with a magic mirror as his only window to the outside world. The rose she had offered was truly an enchanted rose, which would bloom until his 21st year. If he would learn to love another and earn her love in return by the time the last petal fell, then the spell would be broken. If not, he would be doomed to remain a beast for all time. As the years passed, he fell into despair and lost all hope. For who could ever learn to love a beast?

(via suicideblonde)

— 5 hours ago with 5380 notes
#beauty and the beast